Projects Lead Page - chris hilton

Projects ...


When it comes to a Documentary Project, here aren't that many  that I would be happy to draw a line under ... to say they were finished, that they were in some way definitive, there always seems to be more to say or do. So a lot of the work listed here is still on-going, and some of it will be for quite some time.

Obviously, some work is bounded by time and/or place ... an event may be finished or a geographical location might be difficult to re-visit for a multitude of reasons ... so some things do get finished but, even so, perhaps not put to bed entirely ...

Scroll down to see some of the projects I've worked on ...



Obsturcted Views ... it'a all about the stuff that's in the way ... the stuff, that as photographers, we usually seek to leave out of the frame. For me it can often be an integral part of the story.

This is a photograph was taken in a layby in the Atlas Mountains. Tourists stop to capture the grand vista and the hawkers come to capture the tourists. It's a symbiotic relationship that fascinates me; so why would I leave out the mountain of toot? The tourist trinkets are just as important to the story as the mountains that they partly obscure.


Things I saw today ... this is, quite possibly, a project without end ...

I know what kind of photographer I 'think' I am but I often feel there is a disparity between that and what I 'really' am ... and this project is me trying to discover just that.

I take a photograph most days but I am not religious about it, if I don't feel like it then I don't ... it's not forced. There is no plan, no reason, it's entirely visceral. I just react to the things that draw me and, over time, patterns and themes start to emerge ... and it is from them that you start to see the stories ... the real ones, the ones that are already in your subconscious and they are the stories you need to tell, not the ones you feel you 'ought' to be telling.

If you'd like to follow Things I saw today in real time it's here on facebook.


Iceland ... I'd seen so many pictures of Iceland that I felt I knew every nook and cranny before I'd even arrived!

I was familiar with all the major waterfalls, the geysers, the ice beaches and the abandoned plane.

But there's another Iceland ... its beyond the touristy centre of Reykjavik though not quite as far as the stunning, snow laden landscape that belches steam and fire.

Iceland's folklore tells of the 'Hidden People' and it certainly feels like everyone's hiding when you hit the suburbs ... but now and again you can catch a glimpse, a glimpse of a real life. A life lived in the ordinary ... a life lived where there are a lot less cameras.


Plastic Chairs of South East Asia ...

When you see a plastic garden chair away from the garden its unusual, it's obviously out of place and it’s nearly always worth a photograph. 

In SE Asia the chairs are everywhere, there are so many of them that, after a while, you begin to stop noticing ... they are just part of the fabric ... a fabric that I couldn’t see anyone else taking pictures of.

And that got me to thinking ...

And to paraphrase a green frog ...

Sometimes I sits and thinks ... and sometimes I tries to photograph the things I thinks about ...

Shot in just under a month whilst traveling through what was once known as Indo China, the images in this series were captured in Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand and Malaysia.






The Coach Station Parade ... housed a row of low rent shops and the Cafe Royal, a classic piece of 1950's architecture that the developers promised they would save ... in fact, it became a planning restriction but when it was finished, this Dorset Market Town seemed to have aquired an American Strip Mall ...


The Farm ... shot on a rural Dorset Farm over several years and still on-going ...

It all started when they were a man down for the Christmas turkey plucking; would I come along and help? The condition, of course, was that I could bring my camera.

I ended up photographing the turkeys for the next three years. They ended up being the final three years that this long standing Christmas tradition was carried out on that little traditional farm in Dorset.

I also photographed the sheep at various times of the year including the lambing. I was determined to capture the realities of life on a small farm and avoid the rather hackneyed images of lambs gamboling in the field.

I entered five of the lambing photographs into the Documentary Photographer of the Year Competition in 2015. The competition is hosted by the Documentary Group, a special interest group with the Royal Photographic Society. The images went on to secure me the top slot in the amateur section of the competition.